What country has the best cuisine? What did you eat that made you sick? What on earth is airline food really made of? Get answers to these burning questions and more in the Food and Travel Forum.

Best food/drink in Russia and Scandinavia

Wandering Girl

User avatar
Armchair Traveler
 
Posts: 36
Joined: April 25th, 2005
Location: Canada

Share on Orkut

This thread doesn't have any tags.

You can still check out the tag index though.

What are tags?
  • Added on: November 3rd, 2008
I'm heading to Russia, Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark next summer. What food/drink should I try? What should I stay away from? I love food and especially trying new things so your suggestions would be appreciated.
Cheers.

Sophie9

User avatar
Knows What a Schengen Visa Is
 
Posts: 364
Joined: January 4th, 2007

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: November 3rd, 2008
There aren't a lot of kudos to be given to Russian food and drink.

In summer you will find street carts with big barrels of 'kvas'. It's a mildly alcoholic drink made from fermented sourdough Russian rye bread. Awful stuff, but the Russians seem to like it. Also widely available bottled. Cheap.

Vodka. Don't hold back just drink it whenever possible. In retrospect, I should be ashamed of the vast quantity of vodka I consumed in Russia.....but it's so good. Russki Standart should be much to your liking.

Russian beer is generally terrible and full of additives. The ever present Baltika is swill that will give you pounding headaches. Cheap. Stick to the vodka.....

Russian food is the same from Vladimir to Vladivostok, across 11 time zones. Very little variety. Lots of brined smelly fish stuff. Usually delicious and dirt cheap are 'piroshki', little buns stuffed with a variety of fillings. My favorites are kapusta (cabbage) and tvorg, a sweetened cheese. Also good is 'sashlik', fast food spicy grilled meat found everywhere. Other Russian foods I readily eat are the wonderful borsh, and salat 'Olivie', basically potato salad. Note that Russian salads rarely contain green vegetables.

Blini are everywhere. Buckwheat pancakes large and small (blinichki), with meats and cheese, jam and chocolate, every kind of filling. They are wonderful, eat them.

One thing to beware of is: herring-in-a-fur-coat. This is a nasty mess of wet fish under chopped beets and a thick layer of mayonnaise. On every menu in Russia. It is vile.

I would advise you to obtain a hepatitis A vaccination. Hep A is widespread in Russia and sanitary standards are low. Plumbing is hit and miss.

Wandering Girl

User avatar
Armchair Traveler
 
Posts: 36
Joined: April 25th, 2005
Location: Canada

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: November 4th, 2008
Thanks for the advice Sophie9 Smile

moniak

User avatar
Street Food Connoisseur
 
Posts: 580
Joined: November 23rd, 2007

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: December 14th, 2008
Kvass in Rusia as mentioned by Sophie, has the contents of alcohol that's similar to that in apple juice, ie. almost non-existant.
It's quite a nice refreshing drink on hot summer days.

In all the countries you're mentioning herring is one of traditional foods. It's not something the locals eat every day, it's more common though then eslewhere.
There is one specific variety in Sweden, called surstroemming (only for the braves) which no-one would like to eat voluntarily, except for some locals. It's fermented herring (I'd rather say rotten) in brine. It's vile but worth trying for the sheer excitement.
Otherwise, Sweden has changed over the years to more crossover food, and the most restaurants offer dishes with influences from other cuisines. The most popular street food are hotdogs, kebabs and burgers.
I should also mention the Swedish meatballs, but in my opinion it's not the kind of food that's worth a visit to a restaurant. Try a cheap bar of from a street kiosk instead.
Other foods you mights like to try, that wouldn't be common elsewhere, are elk and reindeer meat, although they are not a stapple food, served in every restaurant.
__________________________
gdzie mnie wiatr poniesie

Jhonthompson

User avatar
Lost in Place
 
Posts: 59
Joined: May 13th, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: May 21st, 2009
wow!!!you are going to visit Russia. well as far I know Russia is famous for it's cheap wine. I don't konw about food but you can have vodca, red wine ate a very cheap cost. and of course how can I forget BEER. Good Luck!
I love to travel and I REALLY know South America. If you visit Valle Nevado Chile, contact me.

Christopher Marr

User avatar
Lost in Place
 
Posts: 50
Joined: October 21st, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: October 22nd, 2009
You will travel to Russia I think you should try Okroshka and Shchi. Okroshka is a cold soup based on kvass or less often sour milk and Shchi (cabbage soup) had been the main first course in Russian cuisine for over a thousand years. In Russia, there are a wide variety in beverage. And Almost all Russian traditional drinks are original from Russia and are not present in other national cuisines. Those are vodka, sbiten', kvass, medovukha. Gook luck.

Pottevert

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 8
Joined: October 7th, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: October 22nd, 2009
You could try 'samagon', but buy it carefully , because samagon is home maid Vodka. So it is posible , that some of them are health damaging...
The best time was year ago and now :D

Christopher Marr

User avatar
Lost in Place
 
Posts: 50
Joined: October 21st, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: November 23rd, 2009
You can try Vodka In Russia, The Finland favourite drinks include Marjamehu (berry juices), Pommac (a mixed fruit soda) and Glögi (spiced mulled wine with almonds and raisins). Crayfish is great in Sweden . And Smorrebrod is great dishes in Denmark with the ingredients are: shrimps, pickled herrings, roast pork, fried fish, eggs, vegetables, spread on a thin buttered slice of bread. Have fun.

MilenaizLA

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 3
Joined: December 24th, 2010
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 15th, 2011
In Sweden:
I agree that Surströmming is only for brave.

But there are many other types of herring (called sill or strömming) in Sweden that are worth a try including mustard herring.

There are also reindeer and moose meats and pates. The pates are good with cumberland or lingonberry sauce.

In the summer there is lots of Crayfish.

As for street food, the classic Swedish street food is the Tunnbrödsrulle, which is a large piece of flat bread rolled up with mashed potatoes, a hot dog, shrimp salad, catsup and mustard inside. It is a surprisingly good combination.

I would avoid all pizza in Sweden. It is awful.

marrabel

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 12
Joined: January 9th, 2011

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 21st, 2011
Russia, it is great! Why not to taste Shchi ? This is a kind of a soup that was the representative of the cuisine in Russia. There was much said about 'samogon'. But, my advice here is if you feel weak in drinking the alcohol drinks, then be careful tasting samogon as it is like vodka, but made at home.

Ksiu

User avatar
Guidebook Dependent
 
Posts: 15
Joined: January 21st, 2011

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 24th, 2011
I have heard about samogon there, but have not tasted it yet. There are so many feedbacks of the members that I want to taste. :lol:

marrabel

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 12
Joined: January 9th, 2011

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 26th, 2011
Ksiu wrote:I have heard about samogon there, but have not tasted it yet. There are so many feedbacks of the members that I want to taste. :lol:


:D Post us about your experience when you taste! :lol: Think you will feel good.

Ksiu

User avatar
Guidebook Dependent
 
Posts: 15
Joined: January 21st, 2011

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 28th, 2011
marrabel wrote:
Ksiu wrote:I have heard about samogon there, but have not tasted it yet. There are so many feedbacks of the members that I want to taste. :lol:


:D Post us about your experience when you taste! :lol: Think you will feel good.


:lol: :lol: :lol: Do you think something will happen with my mind after tasting? Anyway I will post you my feedback either with impressions or asking for the help :D



Return to Food & Travel

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

PLEASE NOTE: Your original BootsnAll Boards Member login still works by logging in below on the Boards.
We have a new BootsnAll Account that you will start seeing around the BootsnAll Travel Network. This new login is not yet linked to your current Boards Account. In the meantime, you will need to sign up (for a BootsnAll Account) to use Account features like Indie ™ , Traveler Profiles etc.

Quick Links

Community Activity

Statistics for the last 7 days

New posts:
0
Newest Member:
Stephen


Indie - Multi Country Flight Finder
Round the World Travelers


Join BootsnAll on Facebook

1 (503) 528-1005

© 2018 BootsnAll Travel Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.