Plan your road trip with must-see recommendations. Information on the beaches of California to the tundras of Yukon and everywhere in between.

Canadians are rude and obnoxious

tenspeed

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 7
Joined: January 23rd, 2009

Share on Orkut

This thread doesn't have any tags.

You can still check out the tag index though.

What are tags?
  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
I have recently returned to Canada after having lived over-seas for a number of years. Originally I'm from Edmonton, but I've been living in Vancouver for about a year. It's new years eve and I've just returned from a party where I found the people to be pushy, self-absorbed and obnoxious. All night Canadians talk talk talk to one another whether a band is playing or not, push through the crowd like a stampede of buffaloes, stomp on toes like polar bears, make more noise than niagara falls, and generally act like they deserve all the space in the world.

There's this inherent assumption among Canadians that we are polite and considerate, but I'm quite certain that what is really true is that we are an immature and oblivious nation, unaware of the most basic social conventions, so convinced of our implied status of superiority over our southern neighbours, and in turn become haughty and pretentious.

Canadians are not polite in an honest sense of the word. Canadians are rude, self-centered, and mostly (though peculiarly naive) caught in a superiority complex; there's this modern western notion of individuality that runs rampant and riotous among these northern people where one begins to adopt the laurels of self-righteousness and a childish bravado is birthright.

Holding a door open or apologizing a lot does not earn a politeness merit badge, giving at the least a s**t about those around you does. We Canadians have a lot to learn, this pathetic bunch of privileged ingrates.

Happy new year, dickheads.

busman7

User avatar
World Citizen
 
Posts: 1174
Joined: January 12th, 2008
Location: Traveling for a while away from Playa San Diego SV

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
And that was Vancouver, should see the dufuseses in the GTA that think they live in COTU (the center of the universe), add a police state dictatorship & you have the reason I am an ex-pat.
http://blogs.bootsnall.com/busman7 | http://wwwlasbrisasplayasandiego.blogspot.com
"I started out alone to seek adventures. You don't really have to seek them - that is nothing but a phrase - they come to you." Mark Twain

EMH

Street Food Connoisseur
 
Posts: 609
Joined: May 24th, 2007

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
Weird. I think Canadians are some of the nicest, friendliest people. I've met lots of Canadians during my travels and never had a bad experience.
Follow my travels through Central and South America: www.talesofagringo.com

Fluffy_bunny

User avatar
Lost in Place
 
Posts: 87
Joined: October 28th, 2010
Location: Erbil, Iraq

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
Right. I guess an entire population can be summed up based on a single night where the tradition is to get really drunk. After all, people are always at their best when they're drunk. I'm sure you were completely sober and 100% objective. Excellent observation skills.
For tips and storied on Central Asia, the Middle East and Central America, check out my blog
http://joestrippin.blogspot.com

tenspeed

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 7
Joined: January 23rd, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
I'll ignore your sarcasm and accept that as a compliment and an agreement. Being that I was indeed quite intoxicated, I think my rant is a display of keen observation. You try to do that at 4am.

And as far as excusing people when they're drunk, yes, I'll give people the broad benefit of the doubt for sure, but when an entire party seems to degenerate into a zoo, I am concerned by that consistency. And believe me, I don't mind a zoo; a little chaos and enthusiasm is a great way to have a good time, but there are still levels of decency that I've seen others adhere to, despite being drunk.

I have been to many parties, in many places, and have found the general mood often more amiable and respectful. This post has been a long time coming since moving to Vancouver, not the result of one night. I think I can paint in wide swaths here in certain ways anyway, without feeling like I'm inappropriately generalizing. Canadians are nice and friendly. Sure. Let's include this then: when a band is playing, Canadians talk through-out in loud voices. Next time you're at a show in Vancouver, listen to the din. Unless people are seated, which might be different, but otherwise the most important part of a night out for Canadians is to talk to friends, at all times. See how a Canadian deals with a silent pause in a conversation: they will fill it.

From this tendency, it is not a stretch to infer that Canadians (Vancouverites) have a tendency to appear self-absorbed. Appear. Probably they don't intend, and would deny vehemently, but it is there in twisted fashion, indeed it informs the politeness people often observe.

Canada is lovely, safe, and open, but it is still the 'new world', a part of an experiment that is on-going, a place where its values can be uncertain and ill-defined, so we fill-in-the-blanks, so to speak, because we don't know what else to do. And that naivete, at times, can come across rude and obnoxious.

And come on people, this isn't the 90s anymore, stop moshing.

Andromeda

Street Food Connoisseur
 
Posts: 509
Joined: March 23rd, 2008

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
I have been to many parties, in many places, and have found the general mood often more amiable and respectful. This post has been a long time coming since moving to Vancouver, not the result of one night. I think I can paint in wide swaths here in certain ways anyway, without feeling like I'm inappropriately generalizing. Canadians are nice and friendly. Sure. Let's include this then: when a band is playing, Canadians talk through-out in loud voices. Next time you're at a show in Vancouver, listen to the din. Unless people are seated, which might be different, but otherwise the most important part of a night out for Canadians is to talk to friends, at all times. See how a Canadian deals with a silent pause in a conversation: they will fill it.


I'm trying my hardest to imagine a party with alcohol anywhere in the world where this didn't happen. But even if you didn't like it, you realize there's always a solution in that you can leave parties you're not having fun at right?

I'm half-Canadian and all my friends and relatives north of the border are as kind a sort of people you can expect any in the world (and I will be hard-pressed to speak ill of a country that accepted a family of Hungarian refugees that included my father after WWII when my own country I grew up in closed the door on them instead). The only thing I've ever noticed is Canadians having a slight complex about being not-American as evidenced by how I'm often asked in some areas of the world if I'm Canadian first and American second, but it's an eccentricity I'm willing to tolerate considering how many countless times I needed help and a Canadian was the one who provided it.

tenspeed

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 7
Joined: January 23rd, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
Sure, Canada can open it's doors wide to those that need help, are friendly out on the road, and are generally good-natured. They can also be rude and obnoxious, which stands out due to the perception of Canadians as being inherently 'nice'. That attitude gives everyone, nice or not, a kind of leverage over behaviour that is clearly childish. When I'm told I'm super nice, it's hard to believe that I can be anything else even when behaving badly. It's this obliviousness that is annoying.

As a result, the party was like a daycare; spoiled adults privileged and indulgent to their whims, as if their private conversation is more important than the act on stage, and they are the only ones dancing, wildly and with abandon, with disregard. It's nice to dance and feel free, and talk to friends and drink, but we share these spaces and should respect one another. Niceness is license to be a dick.

Canadians are not Americans, we have our own complexes to deal with; these anxieties stem from basically being a non-culture that has to make itself up and provide new answers to old questions repeatedly as there is little history to draw from. In sum, Canada needs to grow up.

busman7

User avatar
World Citizen
 
Posts: 1174
Joined: January 12th, 2008
Location: Traveling for a while away from Playa San Diego SV

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 1st, 2011
The problem with Canadians became perfectly clear when I crossed the border from Alaska to the Yukon. I had been trying to put my finger on the problem with Australians & bingo once I hit the Yukon border there it was, both OZ & Canada were British colonies that haven't grown up yet. They are governed by simple serpents (way too many) who have an attitude problem & concentrate on how to get the most pay for the least amount of work.
http://blogs.bootsnall.com/busman7 | http://wwwlasbrisasplayasandiego.blogspot.com
"I started out alone to seek adventures. You don't really have to seek them - that is nothing but a phrase - they come to you." Mark Twain

travelkat88

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 5
Joined: December 6th, 2010
Location: Perth, Australia

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 2nd, 2011
Oooh! Did you get out of bed on the wrong side this morning?

Is it at all possible that you matched the rude, obnoxious etc behaviour with a dose of your own? I've always found that one catches many more ants with honey than with vinegar (if you like ants that is). I usually respond nicely to rude people which often surprises them and sets them back on their heels somewhat as they obviously expect rudeness in response to their own.

Anyway, we're just back from India and if you want rudeness, arrogance and hair trigger tempers, that's the place to be.

A very happy, healthy and safe new year to you all.

Tavelkat

EMH

Street Food Connoisseur
 
Posts: 609
Joined: May 24th, 2007

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 2nd, 2011
Can't help but be reminded of the following story:

A traveler came upon an old farmer hoeing in his field beside the road. Eager to rest his feet, the wanderer hailed the countryman, who seemed happy enough to straighten his back and talk for a moment.
"What sort of people live in the next town?" asked the stranger.

"What were the people like where you've come from?" replied the farmer, answering the question with another question.

"They were a bad lot. Troublemakers all, and lazy too. The most selfish people in the world, and not a one of them to be trusted. I'm happy to be leaving the scoundrels."

"Is that so?" replied the old farmer. "Well, I'm afraid that you'll find the same sort in the next town.

Disappointed, the traveler trudged on his way, and the farmer returned to his work.

Some time later another stranger, coming from the same direction, hailed the farmer, and they stopped to talk. "What sort of people live in the next town?" he asked.

"What were the people like where you've come from?" replied the farmer once again.

"They were the best people in the world. Hard working, honest, and friendly. I'm sorry to be leaving them."

"Fear not," said the farmer. "You'll find the same sort in the next town."
Follow my travels through Central and South America: www.talesofagringo.com

Tortuga_traveller

Extra Pages in Passport
 
Posts: 3454
Joined: November 19th, 2004

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 2nd, 2011
Though I would fear to categorize a people by the results of one party, characteristics of a people can be noted without fear that ones personality is being too badly reflected, though of course that reflection will happen.

Invariably I will meet a social manipulator type, known as gregarious to the non-analytic, to say that 'nonsense, these people are fine, you just have to know how to handle them and be friendly...'

But we're doing comparisons with average interactions here, so statements can be made, modified by say, the friendliness and physical attractiveness and charm of the person seeking interaction.

If I had a dollar for every good looking blonde or redhead, good looking and young woman of any type really, who said

"I find everyone to be so charming wherever I go. I don't understand... They hold open doors, and I met some people last week that took me for a drive all around..etc etc."

So, these exceptions of the 'charmers', and of course, the 'grumps', who go through the world eternally expecting trouble and getting it, there are a whole bunch of people who actually can gauge the average level of friendliness and non-selfishness in a culture, or to be more specific, the specific traits of a given culture.

Japanese women smile all the time. It doesn't make them friendly. Japanese men tend to be gruff a lot and show little emotion. It doesn't mean they don't like you.

It very well might be true that some kind of Canadians are outright rude and childish when it comes to getting their own way, or at least inconsiderate.

My brother ran a campground in Upstate NY. It is full of Quebecois and French Canadians. He's not prejudiced in the least, having seen seen all kinds literally roll through,but they seem to be, he said, a bit egotistical and inconsderate of the general public.

But lest we over-specifize here, I can say with some experience that the Spanish have the same tendency, especially when in a family group. THen that family and friend group takes precedence over other needs. If there is an elderly person and two family members, they will take up the entire sidewalk with no concern for those behind them, or just talk in a big circle blocking the way.

So- it could be that Vancouveranians are more than usually boorish, compared to the writers experience of say, Alaska, which is a way different culture.

tenspeed

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 7
Joined: January 23rd, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 2nd, 2011
Let's not get carried away with allegories about my personality; it's cute, and true, but irrelevant here. Indeed,
Tortuga_traveller wrote:characteristics of a people can be noted without fear that ones personality is being too badly reflected.

Let's also not get carried away with
busman7 wrote:The problem with Canadians
or
busman7 wrote:simple serpents.
Civil servants? Anyway...

Sure, we get what we expect, and I like to say that I expect the unexpected, but that doesn't mean I have to like it. Nor does it mean I have to accept, sweetly and with politeness, the rudeness of my own country.

General patterns can be observed and discerned, and some in careful consideration some truth or falsity can be found in those patterns.
EMH wrote: Canadians are some of the nicest, friendliest people.
This doesn't upset anyone, but to say Canadians are rude is unthinkable. Both of these statements are too broad to be of any relevance.

If I have a friend who consistently behaves poorly at parties, is pushy, talks over people, and is generally ill-mannered, I will say something about that. What can be done when everyone joins him in his poor behaviour? My original comments were too broad, but I think the idea here can be made into a specific experiment and a question. Based on only one of my complaints, but I think this one is more easily verifiable, and might indicate a root issue specific to Canada, that other acts of rudeness here mentioned may not.

Do Canadians (let's say Vancouverites) talk over performers more than other people?

EMH

Street Food Connoisseur
 
Posts: 609
Joined: May 24th, 2007

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 2nd, 2011
tenspeed wrote:Let's not get carried away with allegories about my personality; it's cute, and true, but irrelevant here. Indeed,
Tortuga_traveller wrote:characteristics of a people can be noted without fear that ones personality is being too badly reflected.

Let's also not get carried away with
busman7 wrote:The problem with Canadians
or
busman7 wrote:simple serpents.
Civil servants? Anyway...

Sure, we get what we expect, and I like to say that I expect the unexpected, but that doesn't mean I have to like it. Nor does it mean I have to accept, sweetly and with politeness, the rudeness of my own country.

General patterns can be observed and discerned, and some in careful consideration some truth or falsity can be found in those patterns.
EMH wrote: Canadians are some of the nicest, friendliest people.
This doesn't upset anyone, but to say Canadians are rude is unthinkable. Both of these statements are too broad to be of any relevance.

If I have a friend who consistently behaves poorly at parties, is pushy, talks over people, and is generally ill-mannered, I will say something about that. What can be done when everyone joins him in his poor behaviour? My original comments were too broad, but I think the idea here can be made into a specific experiment and a question. Based on only one of my complaints, but I think this one is more easily verifiable, and might indicate a root issue specific to Canada, that other acts of rudeness here mentioned may not.

Do Canadians (let's say Vancouverites) talk over performers more than other people?


Thank you for misquoting me! What I actually wrote is "I think Canadians are some of the nicest, friendliest people". Clearly expressing my opinion. Unlike many of your statements which are written as immutable fact (e.g., Canadians are not polite in an honest sense of the word. Canadians are rude, self-centered, and mostly (though peculiarly naive) caught in a superiority complex;).
Follow my travels through Central and South America: www.talesofagringo.com

tenspeed

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 7
Joined: January 23rd, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 2nd, 2011
Apologies for that leaving out that context; however, I didn't add, 'I think' to my own comments because these aren't things I've daydreamed about, they are observable realities. Probably your comment is the same; that's what you observed and experienced yourself, that Canadians were nice and friendly, no need to qualify.

Anyway, thanks for all the comments; good luck out there in the true north, strong and free (and insincere haha).

marmalade

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 1
Joined: September 3rd, 2009
Location: Toronto, Canada

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: January 3rd, 2011
Perhaps you should pick different places to socialize? It's awesome that you've slandered 30+million people based on your experiences in one crappy party. Obnoxious people exist EVERYWHERE. It doesn't matter where you go, you will find them.


Next

Return to USA & Canada Travel

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

PLEASE NOTE: Your original BootsnAll Boards Member login still works by logging in below on the Boards.
We have a new BootsnAll Account that you will start seeing around the BootsnAll Travel Network. This new login is not yet linked to your current Boards Account. In the meantime, you will need to sign up (for a BootsnAll Account) to use Account features like Indie ™ , Traveler Profiles etc.

Quick Links

Community Activity

Statistics for the last 7 days

New posts:
0
Newest Member:
hungodd94


Indie - Multi Country Flight Finder
Round the World Travelers


Join BootsnAll on Facebook

1 (503) 528-1005

© 2018 BootsnAll Travel Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.