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finding work on the road

Irishcrusader95

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  • Added on: December 6th, 2012
hi everyone

i'm hoping to be leaving for my RTW traveling sometime in february and will have a very decent amount of cash for when i leave but i expect that i will be working now and then when i need to. i just wish to ask for those who have done it how easy or hard is it to find work. it will be mainly restaurant and bar work i'll be looking for as i have experience in this sector.

and while i expect to only be doing this in western style countries like austrial or america is it also possible to get such work in other countries where english is not the primary language, irish pubs perhaps?

Fluffy_bunny

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  • Added on: December 7th, 2012
It's not going to happen. Firstly, it's a safe assumption you do not speak any of the languages of the countries you plan to visit. Furthermore, you will not have the legal right to do so without a work visa. Thirdly, in many non-"western-style" countries, they pay such labour a few dollars a day. They aren't about to pay an illegal foreigner who can't speak the local language more.

America might be a little different. There is some under-the-table work. However, with unemployment at its higher point in decades, competition is fierce. Furthermore, you'd have to be in a place for a some time to establish yourself.

Maybe you gt lucky and something falls into your lap. But if you are relying on it as a source of income forget about it.
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Andromeda

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  • Added on: December 9th, 2012
If you don't plan ahead at all then yeah, I wouldn't bet on it. Sure under the table stuff does happen (often you can get free board at a hostel for a few hours work a day for example) but it's not something someone can count on.

Of course, you don't say how old you are or where you're from, so it's worth mentioning that for some countries you may qualify for a work holiday visa if you're under 30. One needs to apply in advance, but if you do want to work along the way you should probably look into it (Australia seems to be the most popular country for this, other ones I've heard of are NZ and Canada... I believe Ireland and the USA also do it in some capacities).

travel droppings

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  • Added on: December 24th, 2012
I would also say you get a plan together on the places you can work legally and plan the trip around that. Budget for the travel, then plan to stop in a place to work in AUS or NZ to do a working holiday. Then plan to leave and travel your way to the next place so you can work there.

Honestly, I don't think you can expect to be handed jobs just from traveling through to places. Good luck though, and let us know how you go!
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Whistler

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  • Added on: December 26th, 2012
Irishcrusader95 wrote:
i'm hoping to be leaving for my RTW traveling.. i expect that i will be working now and then when i need to. i just wish to ask for those who have done it how easy or hard is it to find work. it will be mainly restaurant and bar work i'll be looking for as i have experience in this sector.

and while i expect to only be doing this in western style countries like austrial or america is it also possible to get such work in other countries where english is not the primary language, irish pubs perhaps?


As far as working in Australia goes, you will need a WHV. Stiff penalties apply to employers who illegally employ people, so it's not worth their while. Those that may, are at best dodgy, pay very badly and if they decide not to pay you, you haven't a leg to stand on.

Bar work requires an RSA certificate - note that different states and territories have different rules, not all are recognised in other states.
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Hedonist

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  • Added on: December 29th, 2012
i expect that i will be working now and then when i need to.


Therein is the whole story in a nutshell. You expect. Good luck with that expectation.

busman7

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  • Added on: December 30th, 2012
Hedonist wrote:
i expect that i will be working now and then when i need to.


Therein is the whole story in a nutshell. You expect. Good luck with that expectation.


Oh-oh he's never heard of Murphy's law :darthmavis: http://www.murphys-laws.com/murphy/murphy-laws.html
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2wanderers

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  • Added on: January 3rd, 2013
Bunch of downers around here these days.

Yes, you can often find work on the road. You can't do it spontaneously, though.

Since you're Irish, you can expect to be able to work legally throughout the EU. There's no shortage of English-speaking people staffing pubs and similar tourist/expat businesses around the continent. Given the economic troubles of the last few years, getting a job isn't necessarily easy, but it should be possible most places (I wouldn't even bother attempting it in Spain, Italy, or Greece). Wages may be less than you're used to, but as a way to live somewhere different and at least cover your costs while you're there, it's not a bad option.

Even as an EU citizen, you may need to register for the local equivalent of a National Insurance number or something before you can legally seek work. Do your research, and don't wait until you're out of money to look seriously for work.

Outside the EU, work opportunities fall into 3 categories: Working Holiday Visas, Teaching English, and Illegal.

The illegal category will pay horribly, if you can even find any of it, and you'll have no legal recourse if your employer screws you over. Getting deported and potentially banned from a country also doesn't seem worth the risk to me.

English teaching opportunities abound worldwide. All the high paying countries (and a few of the low paying ones) require you to have a university degree and a TEFL certificate to find work. In a number of lower-paying countries, language schools are thrilled just to have a native English speaker on staff, and won't require much in way of qualifications....getting a TEFL certificate is still worthwhile, since it'll open some doors, and hopefully give you some clue how to go about instructing a class. If you don't have a university degree to get you into the high-paying countries (Korea, Singapore, Japan, etc), expect to be making less than you do waiting tables at home. My sister used to teach in Mexico, and her pay (much higher than her Mexican colleagues) worked out to around €5/hour.

The final category, WHVs are the standby for young backpackers looking to pick up casual work. They require advance planning, and a number of them start ticking as soon as the visa is issued, not when you arrive in the country. I'll leave you to do the research on what's available to Irish citizens, but the good bets are Oz, NZ and Canada. Most people end up working in the hospitality sector - either bars/restaurants, resorts and ski hills - but parts of Oz and Canada also have a lot of demand for casual labour in the resource sector, which can be quite lucrative.

The good jobs are more often found in the places that you're less interested in traveling to in a country. In Canada, for instance, the same skills and work permit will allow you to
a - compete with 10 other people for a minimum wage job in Banff, and have more of a fun travel experience, or
b - have 3 employers competing for your services in Fort McMurray, provided you'll live in a work camp in a desolate industrial landscape, and put in 12 hour days on a 21 days on/3 days off cycle.

busman7

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  • Added on: January 4th, 2013
2wanderers wrote:Bunch of downers around here these days.

Yes, you can often find work on the road. You can't do it spontaneously, though.

Since you're Irish, you can expect to be able to work legally throughout the EU. There's no shortage of English-speaking people staffing pubs and similar tourist/expat businesses around the continent. Given the economic troubles of the last few years, getting a job isn't necessarily easy, but it should be possible most places (I wouldn't even bother attempting it in Spain, Italy, or Greece). Wages may be less than you're used to, but as a way to live somewhere different and at least cover your costs while you're there, it's not a bad option.

Even as an EU citizen, you may need to register for the local equivalent of a National Insurance number or something before you can legally seek work. Do your research, and don't wait until you're out of money to look seriously for work.

Outside the EU, work opportunities fall into 3 categories: Working Holiday Visas, Teaching English, and Illegal.

The illegal category will pay horribly, if you can even find any of it, and you'll have no legal recourse if your employer screws you over. Getting deported and potentially banned from a country also doesn't seem worth the risk to me.

English teaching opportunities abound worldwide. All the high paying countries (and a few of the low paying ones) require you to have a university degree and a TEFL certificate to find work. In a number of lower-paying countries, language schools are thrilled just to have a native English speaker on staff, and won't require much in way of qualifications....getting a TEFL certificate is still worthwhile, since it'll open some doors, and hopefully give you some clue how to go about instructing a class. If you don't have a university degree to get you into the high-paying countries (Korea, Singapore, Japan, etc), expect to be making less than you do waiting tables at home. My sister used to teach in Mexico, and her pay (much higher than her Mexican colleagues) worked out to around €5/hour.

The final category, WHVs are the standby for young backpackers looking to pick up casual work. They require advance planning, and a number of them start ticking as soon as the visa is issued, not when you arrive in the country. I'll leave you to do the research on what's available to Irish citizens, but the good bets are Oz, NZ and Canada. Most people end up working in the hospitality sector - either bars/restaurants, resorts and ski hills - but parts of Oz and Canada also have a lot of demand for casual labour in the resource sector, which can be quite lucrative.

The good jobs are more often found in the places that you're less interested in traveling to in a country. In Canada, for instance, the same skills and work permit will allow you to
a - compete with 10 other people for a minimum wage job in Banff, and have more of a fun travel experience, or
b - have 3 employers competing for your services in Fort McMurray, provided you'll live in a work camp in a desolate industrial landscape, and put in 12 hour days on a 21 days on/3 days off cycle.


If you look at how his posts written, poor grammar/spelling he is obviously hasn't the education nor is he qualified for anything but menial labour. He also has no plans so getting WHV's for Canada/OZ are out.

Then there is his response "i expect that i will be working now and then when i need to."

Seems to me he got some excellent honest advise from the "Bunch of downers around here these days." 8-)
"Being normal? Ugh. I can't imagine how awful that must be" unknown

Whistler

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Joined: December 5th, 2006
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  • Added on: January 19th, 2013
2wanderers wrote:

English teaching opportunities abound worldwide. In a number of lower-paying countries, language schools are thrilled just to have a native English speaker on staff, and won't require much in way of qualifications....getting a TEFL certificate is still worthwhile, since it'll open some doors, and hopefully give you some clue how to go about instructing a class. If you don't have a university degree to get you into the high-paying countries (Korea, Singapore, Japan, etc), expect to be making less than you do waiting tables at home. My sister used to teach in Mexico, and her pay (much higher than her Mexican colleagues) worked out to around €5/hour.



Even if you have a TEFL, you still need a work permit to work in SEA - Thailand, Laos etc.
Never judge a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes.

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