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for those who are worried about their kids' schooling. . .

go girl now

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  • Added on: May 6th, 2010
dont. My oldest dd was in 9th grade when we took our RTW and we were a bit concerned about her missing that year of high school, though not overly so. When we got back, we enrolled the girls in public school and the school was insistent that she make those credits up, even though I wrote up a huge list of the learning activities we'd done on the road. (Who can beat watching turtles lay their eggs on the beach or petting tigers in Thailand for biology classes?) I was irritated but agreed b/c this is a great school with a graduating class of only 57 this year.

Well, long story short, but my dd is a graduating senior this year and just got a full ride scholarship to the college of her choice and the counselor suspects that it's b/c of her RTW trip experience. She thinks my dd may be the poster child for this university, which really touts it's international program, and my daughter is planning to major in international relations.

Well, had to share--we're so excited and we didn't ruin her future for our selfishness after all, as I wondered at times in my darker moments.

m&pg

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  • Added on: May 9th, 2010
That's great, congratulations to your daughter :D
There's a part of me that fears I'll damage my children on our RTW trip (we leave UK in Sept), so it's good to hear positive experiences too.

go girl now

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  • Added on: May 10th, 2010
Have them keep travel journals. They're extremely entertaining to read later and can be used as proof that at least you kept them up with their writing. :D

KathrynD

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  • Added on: May 18th, 2010
My son is in 9th grade and he's having a bad time of it. I'm so tempted to pull him out and just go traveling with him for a year. Maybe after the break he would be able to come back and focus on school in a better way, being more mature. Not sure.

Of course, it would help if my son enjoyed traveling - he's just one of those kids who prefers the computer world to the real world. I some times think he's rebelling against traveling because I'm so keen on it.

Anyway, thanks for the food for thought. I do sometimes think that maybe he needs a break from traditional schooling.

Seafarer

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  • Added on: May 19th, 2010
Because traveling kids get 1) focused instructor attention from parents, and 2) immeasurable value from travel, they do very well academically in terms of keeping up with classmates in traditional schools.

My anecdotal experience is that they're usually far ahead, in fact, so relieving boredom is a problem upon return.
Sheila Scarborough
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PDXnative

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  • Added on: May 19th, 2010
KathrynD wrote:My son is in 9th grade and he's having a bad time of it. I'm so tempted to pull him out and just go traveling with him for a year. Maybe after the break he would be able to come back and focus on school in a better way, being more mature. Not sure.

Of course, it would help if my son enjoyed traveling - he's just one of those kids who prefers the computer world to the real world. I some times think he's rebelling against traveling because I'm so keen on it.

Anyway, thanks for the food for thought. I do sometimes think that maybe he needs a break from traditional schooling.


Do it! Even for just 6 months. What better way to spend time with your son before he enters into adulthood.
Planning our family RTW Trip on:
http://travel-junkies.com

Twitter: GoRTW

JR_TheDriftersBlog

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  • Added on: May 19th, 2010
what a great post! i think its only natural for parents to be worried about their childrens schooling, after all they truly care for their well being. but i know several families who have transplanted a broad, and also a few who have trekked the globe, with their children, and i have seen that these young ones have a very open, mature sense of the world as a whole. it almost gives them an advantage as they are thinking global, and not just concerned with whats going on within a 2 block radius of their front lawn. kudos to great post!
JR@ DriftersBlog.com "The Drifters Blog" has tips, thoughts & inspiration for your next trip!

go girl now

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  • Added on: May 23rd, 2010
And now the downside: giving your kids an international focus means that they'll be likelier to move to France or Australia someday, leaving you here 1000 miles away. :shock: But then again, you have such a great place to go visit them.

KathrynD, about your son--how about seeking a volunteer experience for the 2 of you. I guarantee he'll be against it and you for a little while and breaking his addictions will be hard, but once that is over, he'll probably really get into it and seeing those less fortunate than himself will probably assure that he'll focus on school (and life!) when he gets back. Transitions Abroad and Idealist.org have lots of info about overseas volunteering. We had the girls do some of the trip planning too--they had to decide what we were going to do and how we were going to do it. We also sent them up to buy tix occasionally and let them work the tix machines, which they were better at than we were. I figured it was part of their education. For the upcoming trip to Peru, my daughter had to order the airline tix. I showed her how to check prices and had her check every day or so until the price came down and then she got us all a good deal. Now I'm a bit nervous b/c she hasn't done anything else toward that, but she did just graduate on Fri.

KathrynD

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  • Added on: May 25th, 2010
Thanks for the thoughts GoGirl and PDXnative. I think he will squeak out of this year with passing grades and then we'll think of what to do during the summer. Right now, his passion is creating - modeling and programming - video games and he's good at it. He will be doing that in summer camps so I think that's a good thing.

I'm still thinking about whether to do long term travel with him - it's very tempting for me because travel is my passion.

My child does need time to mature and experiences that help him with it. High school does not always provide the right environment for him.

Of course, long term travel requires big changes for my husband's and my careers. My husband is probably retiring (early-ish) from his job next year in the spring. I think that's the time to look at for possible travel as a family. My original thought was to wait until my son went away from college, and at the point, the parents could run away from home...but perhaps that will change.

Thanks for the good thoughts. I need to weigh what is best for all of us. I will give it a lot of thought because it's an option I hadn't really considered until now.

WT

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  • Added on: May 27th, 2010
Absolutely true! We hear these kinds of stories over and over. Travel truly is the best possible education for 21st century global citizens. Have you read The New Global Student:
Skip the SAT,Save Thousands on Tuition,and Get a Truly International Education?
[url]
http://www.mayafrost.com/new-global-student-book.htm[/url]

Filled with such stories. I've never heard of a traveling family that did not benefit tremendously.

We have been traveling the world non-stop as a family for four years & the educational opportunities have been astounding! Our daughter is many years ahead of her age peers academically and we are monolinguals raising a very fluent trilingual/ tri-literate ( Chinese, Spanish, English) who also speaks lots of many other languages. She takes her violin, piano and Chinese classes online with teachers on another continent while we roam the world, living large on just 23 dollars a day per person!!

Education is going through an extreme change and that will continue to happen. I've written much about it on our www.soultravelers3.com website and Huffington Post:

http://www.soultravelers3.com/2010/01/seth-godin-lynchpin-education-travel-new-economy-digital-nomad.html

By the end of this decade 60% of ALL schools will be virtual. Many of us can work AND school ANY where, thus immerse deeply into other cultures , REALLY travel and live a more free life.


[url]
http://www.soultravelers3.com/2010/04/f ... round.html[/url]

Most schools are educating kids for jobs in the 1950's, so smart folks are staying ahead of the curve. Travel is a fantastic way to do it. Multi-culturalism and multi-lingualism will be a huge advantage in the future and you don't have to go into debt to get the best education in the world while having the time of your life and bonding deeply as a family.
http://www.soultravelers3.com

I am always doing that
which I can not do,
in order that
I may learn how to do it.
PABLO PICASSO

WT

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  • Added on: May 27th, 2010
BIG congrats btw for your daughter GoGirl!!


KathrynD- I'd DEFINITELY hit the world road with your son...and also let him pursue the areas that interest him. Encourage entrepreneur skills now as you go with areas that interest him...it's the wave of the future. The school system is dumb & not supporting your kids strengths.
[url]
http://www.amazon.com/College-Without-H ... 0865716552[/url]

http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html

http://reason.com/archives/2001/10/01/schools-out/
http://www.soultravelers3.com

I am always doing that
which I can not do,
in order that
I may learn how to do it.
PABLO PICASSO

go girl now

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  • Added on: June 1st, 2010
Great links WT! I really liked Sir Ken.

MummyT

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  • Added on: June 18th, 2010
It's wonderful to see how great an experience travel can be for children, not just as kids but as they emerge into adulthood. Well done to your daughter!!! And, well done, you...

We're using an anarchic approach called unschooling, which is working wonders for us. I'd highly recommend that anyone thinking about homeschooling as they travel consider it: I wrote a little about it here.

http://travelswithanineyearold.com/2010 ... _learning/
Travelling the world with one small son
www.travelswithanineyearold.com

nancy sv

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  • Added on: July 17th, 2010
It is always wonderful to hear from other traveling families that their kids are doing well! Although I know (intellectually) that travel is the best thing for our sons, I will admit to times of doubt - reading about successful traveling kids is great!

Our sons have been traveling their whole lives (they are 12 now). They lived as expats in various countries (Ethiopia, Taiwan, Malaysia) until they were seven, and have now cycled 35,000 km through 13 countries! It's been a phenomenal experience for all of us.

The main thing I notice is that the boys seem to absorb knowledge as though through osmosis - they appear to be out playing around and not paying attention, but they know everything anyway. I think the travel itself opens their brains and makes it easier for them to learn.

I've posted lots of info about our experiences on our website: http://familyonbikes.org/resources.htm
Join our family we cycle from Alaska to Argentina! www.familyonbikes.org

midlife meanderer

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  • Added on: October 15th, 2010
That is so nice to hear. I am going to take my middle schooler and two elementary schoolers on a RTW trip and have to keep constantly batting back the need for a whole elaborate curriculum to take with me. I want it to be learn as you go and keep in only a little math and journal writing but there are dark thoughts of "what about science? shouldn't I make up a reading list for global religions to take advantage of our travels? etc." I also want it to be just the first foundation of a lifetime of learning by doing so hopefully it will not just be a one off experience!


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