Discuss and debate travel gear: backpacks, boots, packing stuff and all things technical like phones, mp3 players, GPS systems and other techno-gadgets.

Hanes tee's?

excuse the dust

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  • Added on: April 23rd, 2011
Does anyone travel with regular clothes? I've noticed lately that Hanes has gotten into the blend/wicking game with some of their shirts. At the rate with which i destroy clothes I'm hesitant to spend a lot for technical clothing. Any suggestions?

Traveler_2007

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  • Added on: April 23rd, 2011
Many many people travel with "normal" clothes. Under certain conditions some fabrics will better meet specific needs. Unless you absolutely need special clothing ( N or S pole for example...) you can easily and likely very succesfully travel with what you wear every day. Probably a good start would be to figure out where you go, and then make sure your budget supports your trip. If you still have room in your budget then deal with clothing, unless there are special conditions ( very wet, extreme temperatures...) and then you have no choice.

The "technical" clothes can be quite pricey also. Some brands are trully spectacular in delivering their promise while some not so much. So, I'm saying a bit of testing would help. If you plan on doing a fair amount of travel some "technical" clothing would likely enhance your trips. Same goes for luaggage. Very very wide range available.

Good luck and enjoy your trip

Mama-to-many

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  • Added on: April 23rd, 2011
Apart from a longsleeved merino tshirt (which I now wear all the time at home because it was so good), we travelled in whatever we had in the cupboard when we left.
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Tortuga_traveller

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  • Added on: April 24th, 2011
I now have a set of clothes I can put together in a hurry for any trip to a temperate or warm climate.

They consist of-
Silk shirts(they wash by hand well, keep you warm in the cool, keep you cool in the warm)
Long sleeved shirts made of a loose weave
Long pants(I like the travel pants that are zipaways. Not because I zip them away, because they dry fast, and are reasonably tough
One pair of shorts, maybe two
regular bathing suit
Short sleeved shirts
a wool sweater or two
a fleece type jacket(now I use something with polartec in it, its lighter)
A waterproof, windproof shell(Used to take my old winter shell and lightweight one, but the winter shell got lost, and I don't want to pay the over 150 dollars to replace it unless I intend to live in winter regions again.)
and yes, Hanes underwear, though lately I've taken to cotton briefs with color patterns.

I DO try to only travel with either silk sock liners for serious hiking, or wool socks, of varying degrees of thickness. Wool socks, especially the sweat-channeling ones, are definitely worth investing in. They wash out well, dry out reasonably fast depending on thickness, and don't smell up like polyester, or fall apart in 3 weeks like cheap cotton-polyester socks. I am partial to Smartwool but other brands do exist. They make socks like Coolmax for hot weather, temperate climate socks, and cold weather socks. I carry all three kinds on a RTW. Can't have too many socks, since if you have too few, you get foot fungus faster from overuse, thanks to not having time to wash them. There is nothing colder than being in cold weather with wet socks, so you need as many changes in cold weather, believe it or not. Especially since you can't wear open air shoes that lets the sweat breathe out.

In short, unless you're going to Alaska, the north pole, Patagonia, or climbing icy mountains, the clothes for a temperate environment plus the clothes you can get while travelling(often the best for the region) will do just fine. One of these days I'll break down and take only what I'm wearing,my passport and money, and see what I can do with that. Maybe a sweater and a waterproof in the daypack, just to be sure. If I feel like taking weight, I can add ONE change of clothes and wash a lot. I've done it before on the Camino de Santiago. it took time, but there is a feeling of freedom attached to moving so lightly.

excuse the dust

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  • Added on: April 27th, 2011
Wow! Thank you so much!


Tortuga_traveller wrote:I now have a set of clothes I can put together in a hurry for any trip to a temperate or warm climate.

They consist of-
Silk shirts(they wash by hand well, keep you warm in the cool, keep you cool in the warm)
Long sleeved shirts made of a loose weave
Long pants(I like the travel pants that are zipaways. Not because I zip them away, because they dry fast, and are reasonably tough
One pair of shorts, maybe two
regular bathing suit
Short sleeved shirts
a wool sweater or two
a fleece type jacket(now I use something with polartec in it, its lighter)
A waterproof, windproof shell(Used to take my old winter shell and lightweight one, but the winter shell got lost, and I don't want to pay the over 150 dollars to replace it unless I intend to live in winter regions again.)
and yes, Hanes underwear, though lately I've taken to cotton briefs with color patterns.

I DO try to only travel with either silk sock liners for serious hiking, or wool socks, of varying degrees of thickness. Wool socks, especially the sweat-channeling ones, are definitely worth investing in. They wash out well, dry out reasonably fast depending on thickness, and don't smell up like polyester, or fall apart in 3 weeks like cheap cotton-polyester socks. I am partial to Smartwool but other brands do exist. They make socks like Coolmax for hot weather, temperate climate socks, and cold weather socks. I carry all three kinds on a RTW. Can't have too many socks, since if you have too few, you get foot fungus faster from overuse, thanks to not having time to wash them. There is nothing colder than being in cold weather with wet socks, so you need as many changes in cold weather, believe it or not. Especially since you can't wear open air shoes that lets the sweat breathe out.

In short, unless you're going to Alaska, the north pole, Patagonia, or climbing icy mountains, the clothes for a temperate environment plus the clothes you can get while travelling(often the best for the region) will do just fine. One of these days I'll break down and take only what I'm wearing,my passport and money, and see what I can do with that. Maybe a sweater and a waterproof in the daypack, just to be sure. If I feel like taking weight, I can add ONE change of clothes and wash a lot. I've done it before on the Camino de Santiago. it took time, but there is a feeling of freedom attached to moving so lightly.

vagabondette74

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Location: San Cristobal Mexico currently

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  • Added on: April 27th, 2011
I generally travel with normal and cheap clothes. This is because I generally lose significant amounts of weight while traveling so I have to buy clothes while on the road. So, I'll got to walmart and get a pair of pants for $10 and just about when they're wearing out is when they'll be too big to wear so I'll buy something locally.
Traveling through Mexico and Central America starting in January '09. Hit me up if you want to meet!

excuse the dust

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Joined: December 28th, 2010
Location: Florida

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  • Added on: April 28th, 2011
vagabondette74 wrote:I generally travel with normal and cheap clothes. This is because I generally lose significant amounts of weight while traveling so I have to buy clothes while on the road. So, I'll got to walmart and get a pair of pants for $10 and just about when they're wearing out is when they'll be too big to wear so I'll buy something locally.

I'm in the same boat where I lose weight when I travel. This is why I'm hesitant to invest in expensive clothing. Glad to see I'm not the only one.



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