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Quitting Veg for travel.

DavidAM

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  • Added on: July 24th, 2010
AmazingJulesVerne wrote:I was a vegetarian for ten years and then I went to Italy and ate every kind of specialty cured meat available. I never felt badly about it and thoroughly enjoyed myself the entire time.

When I returned home, I missed all of those delicious meats and the fun times I had with people while sitting around the table so I sought out all of the best import markets in town to try to locate some of those delicacies. Turns out I never went back to being a full time vegetarian since that time.

Many of my vegetarian friends have given me endless amounts of crap about my barbaric meat eating ways but I really don't care. I eat what I want because I enjoy eating tasty food. Ultimately, I agree with the idea that food is a big part of travel and it's inherent cultural experience. Why would you want to miss out on that?

Travel, too, is about being open minded. Is it open minded to dogmatically cling to vegetarianism, unless it really is for health reasons?

Side story: One of my pals traveled through South America for over a year and, at one point, stayed in a small village for several months. She helped out around the village with child care and other kinds of activities and became very close with all of the people there. She is quietly vegan and never had any problems finding what she wanted to eat but never proselytized her veganism as some people annoyingly do.

On the very last day of her stay in this village, a party was thrown in her honor. As the guest of honor, she was asked to slaughter the goat for the feast, using, of course, a very large knife applied to the animal's throat. She was very anxious about this task but then decided that it was an honor and that she should do it. At the very least, she would have an amazing story to tell about the experience. At the most, it was a very big deal that she was asked to do this as, she found out later, no woman in this village was ever allowed to slaughter animals -- that was a man's job. You can see that this was a huge honor, then, that she was asked to perform this task.

She slaughtered the goat.

Afterward, to celebrate, the men painted the blood on her face and cut off the horns and gave them to her. Five years later, she has one of the coolest maté 'gourds' ever -- the goat horn was made into a maté drinking vessel for her (which is a whole other story)! She does not at all regret her decisions to participate and to eat the goat and would have felt terribly had she refused to do it, especially after she discovered what a truly great honor had been bestowed upon her in the asking.


What a great story! I agree completely with everything you've said.
"Change is the essence of life. Be willing to surrender what you are for what you could become."

Sea of Derailments - http://davidamis.wordpress.com
DavidAM Bandcamp - http://davidam.bandcamp.com

vegan travel to organic farm in bulgaria

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  • Added on: December 21st, 2010
Eco tourism has been increasing by 10-15% annually, reflecting the interest by consumers to help save our planet. One good way to do this is to stay at organic farms, where the food you eat is grown. You can stay out in nature and enjoy the fresh air. Additionally, people in rural areas tend to be more genuine, honest and giving than city folk. Not only will you enjoy clean air, living and healthy food, but you can experience the real culture of the country you are visiting. If you come to Bulgaria we would love to host you.

http://001yourtranslationservice.com/travel-Europe/country-links/Bulgaria/Eco-Travel-as-a-Tourist-to-Organic-Farm-in-Bulgaria_Healthy-Holiday-Tourism-for-Vegans-Vegetarians-and-Green-Minded-Travelers-and-Tourists.html

KenLuck

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  • Added on: December 21st, 2010
David, it’s up to you. If you want to try everything while travelling - just do it. I agree with Seraphim that it can be kind of rude to say you won't eat or drink smth in different countries. It would be better to get ready beforehand. Just find some information in the internet before your leaving. And if you find out that it will be rude to refuse, and then just try only a little piece. ;)

lauracatherine

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  • Added on: December 21st, 2010
I'm not sure if this was related, but I do not have a stomach made of steel.

The entire time I traveled as a vegetarian, I did not get traveler's diarrhea once. Every other time I went abroad and ate meat, like everyone else, I had stomach problems.
"i'm on my way, don't know where i'm goin..."~Paul Simon, Me and Julio

DavidAM

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  • Added on: January 5th, 2011
I've only been Veg for almost 2 years now but whenever I'm near meat and I can smell it, it makes me nauseous. Whenever I've had something that's come into contact with meat it's given me a massive stomach ache. I think maybe I'd rather stick to fruit and veggies while I'm out there. I don't want to become incapacitated while traveling. I know the longer you go Veg, the harder it is to actually go back and eat meat.
"Change is the essence of life. Be willing to surrender what you are for what you could become."

Sea of Derailments - http://davidamis.wordpress.com
DavidAM Bandcamp - http://davidam.bandcamp.com

b_xandari

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  • Added on: January 20th, 2011
I think it is all about your personal reasons and beliefs. Personally I plan to stay as Vegan as possible during my travels, but occassionally I'm sure I'll want to try some cheeses or the like. But me & meat have never got along. I agree w/ you David, meat makes me nauseous too.
"Life is either a daring adventure or nothing." Helen Keller.

Food Pilgrim

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  • Added on: January 21st, 2011
Just keep in mind the significant difference between avoiding foods you'd rather not eat versus making a scene of insistence.

There is no doubt that it is possible to accommodate any eating style with enough effort. But to limit oneself in the face of new cultural experiences really robs from the notion of travel. As with all thins sin travel (and life) better not to make any hard fast rules.
My wife has a saying she dug up from somewhere "if you still use the terms always and never, you're not leaving room for experience".

Consider also that in many parts of the world having "foodisms" is entirely laughable, as people struggle to meet daily caloric needs. In more refined and well of food cultures, having foodisms is just seen as poor manners.
Sage.


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