Head Down Under and yap about bloody Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. Determine the best place to buy a car, how to get a working holiday visa and the best route for travelling the east coast of Oz and around the Kiwi Islands.

Travelling around

dimz

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  • Added on: July 22nd, 2010
I'm quite hesitating. I arrived in Australia 21 days ago, and am located in Brisbane right now. I'm here on a WHV. I feel like it's time to move on but am hesitating on how to travel around. All options are available to me right now. I wan't to travel over land, avoiding any planes. What's the best way to get around, if any ? I looked up for buses, trains, and cars. Hitchhiking would be an option too. Right now I can'r make up my mind. Each way has it's pros and cons, some are cheaper, others more expensive, but offer more flexibility. What would you suggest ?
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uspn

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  • Added on: July 24th, 2010
If you really want to travel over land, clearly walking is the most suitable option.

Check out The Overland Track (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overland_Track) in the Tasmanian north-west. One of the best thing I've ever done in Australia. Mind you, during the best hiking season you'll have to book with the Parks&Wildlife people before you're allowed to go on this hike.

To get to the starting point I recommend flying into Hobart, leave your stuff there, get on the bus to Cradle Lake and then walk back. Or you could walk to Melbourne, get on the boat to Devonport, Tasmania from there, and take another bus to Cradle Lake, via Launceston.

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busman7

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  • Added on: July 24th, 2010
Greyhound has numerous pass options but of the 40 countries visited on my RTW they were the only one where I had concerns for my safety traveling with over tired,unsafe drivers!!
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larizzle

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  • Added on: July 27th, 2010
If you make friends at a hostel, you can go in on renting a car together and that'll reduce the cost.

Otherwise, Greyhound may have a decent deal of some kind.

I came across a lot of people who were selling their cars for $1500 or less, which would be great for independence, but could come with its own set of problems.

zoieykate

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  • Added on: August 11th, 2010
I think the best option by far is putting adds up in hostels and looking forums to share rides. Meet people in hostels and go from there.

If you want to get somewhere fast there are always relocation car deals if you are over 25 (I think). This is where a hire car company need a car to get back to a particular place, google it.

LilaBear

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  • Added on: October 19th, 2010
If you really want to travel overland, then pretty much your only options are buses or renting a car. Australia has very few long-distance trains. Keep in mind that if you are travelling overland you are going to be taking up a lot of time travelling very long distances, and in many states (eg. Queensland, Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia) there is often nothing interesting for many hundreds of kilometres.

I have never felt unsafe with a Greyhound bus driver. I've only taken a long-distance bus trip once (11 hours ) and the bus had two drivers who alternated every few hours and slept while the other was driving. I slept most of the time as it was an overnight trip but every time we stopped and I woke up, the bus driver was chipper and chatting away to people.

Regarding the Overland Track suggested by uspn (if you are indeed interested in hiking and are interested in going to Tasmania), you need a reasonable level of fitness and preparation to do said track, and you need to register no matter what time of year you are walking it. It goes from Cradle Mountain in the south to Lake St Claire in the north. For half the year you are required to depart from Cradle Mt and hike north, the other half you are required to start at Lake St Claire and hike south. If you are hiking during peak season you will be required to pay a fee of $160. You will also be required to pay for a National Park Pass if you haven't already got one for accessing Tasmania's other national parks. Read more about the hike here: http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/?base=7771

amalthea

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  • Added on: November 20th, 2010
Personally, I feel the best way to get around is to spend a couple grand on a decent campervan or wagon. Have it checked out by a reliable mechanic, as a lot of backpacker vehicles don't get the attention they need. But at least this way you have transportation AND a home to live in.

busman7

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  • Added on: November 21st, 2010
[quote="LilaBear"]I

I have never felt unsafe with a Greyhound bus driver. I've only taken a long-distance bus trip once (11 hours ) and the bus had two drivers who alternated every few hours and slept while the other was driving. I slept most of the time as it was an overnight trip but every time we stopped and I woke up, the bus driver was chipper and chatting away to people.


I was on a trip from Broome to Katharine that had 2 drivers that alternated at 12 hour shifts which is extremely STUPID (I have over 25 yrs experience as a bus owner/operator/driver + driver trainer & safety coordinator).

On another trip from Tennant Creek (the a**hole of the world) to Mount Isa the driver who had been weaving & dropping off the shoulder for 1/2 hr came within a couple inches of hitting a parked pickup near the bus station in Mount Isa, all because he didn't have the intelligence to pull over & take a walk around the bus to refresh himself.

NO where else in the world did I notice drivers falling asleep on overnight bus trips & I took a lot of them!
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sanntick

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  • Added on: December 21st, 2010
Get a travel map first. Then plan your trip by seeing the best rail or road connections between different destinations. This is the easiest solution. Also ask the local people the best connectivity between two places.
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Brooke vs. the World

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  • Added on: December 29th, 2010
Campervans are totally the way to go. They give you the freedom you need to get out and explore what makes Australia so freaking awesome - nature! :)
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pyoung

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  • Added on: January 4th, 2011
larizzle wrote:If you make friends at a hostel, you can go in on renting a car together and that'll reduce the cost.

Otherwise, Greyhound may have a decent deal of some kind.

I came across a lot of people who were selling their cars for $1500 or less, which would be great for independence, but could come with its own set of problems.


I totally agree with larizzle. If one is on budget then he should find a good hostel accommodation and make reliable friends there. Then he can think of joint renting a vehicle to travel around.

lgsmith

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  • Added on: February 9th, 2011
Yes, ofcourse you need to hire a car and make the friends free of mind. :lol:

Beachcombers

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  • Added on: February 11th, 2011
Ok, Australia is a ridiculously insanely large country. Getting from A-B can mean covering large distances.....

Buy a car/campervan. Pretty easy to do, every hostel/internet cafe will have ad's with backpackers truing to sell their vehicles before they move on. I did this, bought a car for $800 and it was awesome! Drove from Melbourne to Darwin vi Perth (a bloody long way) and sold it in three days for the same price.

And whatever you do, don't watch "Wolf Creek" before heading out into the outback.
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  • Added on: March 13th, 2011
The best solution is to make use of car rental services. When I travel, I often get scared of commuting also. Especially if I'm in a strange city, it would be adventurous to go and explore the city but it is dangerous. I consult http://www.rentalcarscode.com/ each time I travel and need to rent a car. In this way, I wouldn't have any transportation problems anymore.
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RyuKamagata

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  • Added on: March 30th, 2011
dimz wrote:I'm quite hesitating. I arrived in Australia 21 days ago, and am located in Brisbane right now. I'm here on a WHV. I feel like it's time to move on but am hesitating on how to travel around. All options are available to me right now. I wan't to travel over land, avoiding any planes. What's the best way to get around, if any ? I looked up for buses, trains, and cars. Hitchhiking would be an option too. Right now I can'r make up my mind. Each way has it's pros and cons, some are cheaper, others more expensive, but offer more flexibility. What would you suggest ?


Trains offer the class of airplanes but with much of the scenery and on-the-ground contact you get from cars/buses/hitching. Ultimately, I would pursue rail travel, but if not, perhaps by bus? The downside of flying is that you miss much of the scenic beauty Australia has to offer.


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