Discuss a good book to read on a trip or movies that make you long to be on the road. Share your recommendations for music - both your old favorites and the new ones you discovered overseas. Brag about run-ins with the hottest upcoming bands.

What are you reading now?

Lia 80

Guidebook Dependent
 
Posts: 20
Joined: January 12th, 2009

Share on Orkut

This thread doesn't have any tags.

You can still check out the tag index though.

What are tags?
  • Added on: January 28th, 2009
In this period I'm reading a WONDERFUL book. Its title in English is "Why Italians like to talk about food". It's written by a Russian, she lives in Italy and is Umberto Eco's translator - Elena Kost'iukovich. She wrote this exceptional book, which has a chapter for each Italian region and between one and the other there's a chapter that talks about a specific topic. She writes about history and food, it's really very very interesting. By the way, I've heard that it's a common thought that Italians love to talk about food, and that we are the only ones who can talk about food even while eating...do you guys think it's true?? - actually, I have to admit it...yes. We do :D

13rook

User avatar
Armchair Traveler
 
Posts: 39
Joined: February 9th, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: February 14th, 2009
I'm almost done with Rolf Pott's "Vagabonding", which I HIGHLY recommend (although I have a feeling a lot of you have already read it). I'm also reading "Worldwalk" by Steven Newman. He only lives a couple hours away from me, which is kind of cool. Here's this guy from southern Ohio that walked all around the world by himself. It's definitely a good book. :)

mobilescribe

Guidebook Dependent
 
Posts: 15
Joined: January 8th, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: February 17th, 2009
"Vagabonding" looks really great. Just checked it out on Amazon.

I just finished "Guns, Germs and Steel," by Jared Diamond. For people who like to backpack around in remote (and often less economically developed) countries like I do, it really puts the inequality of development and technology in an interesting historical perspective. I think it's a must read for backpackers... Not at all dry reading like I thought it would be.
--------------
George Mastras

Arre

User avatar
Holds PhD in Packing
 
Posts: 248
Joined: January 26th, 2005

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: March 19th, 2009
1. The World Without Us by Alan Weisman. This is pretty fantastic so far. It's about what would happen if all the people on earth disappeared one day- how long it would take our houses, roads, and cities to break down and be reclaimed by nature.

2. Wilderness and the American Mind by Roderick Nash. Pretty interesting discussion of the changing perception of wilderness from a US perspective, first as an enemy to be overcome in westward expansion and colonization, and later as a thing of beauty and sublimity to be protected from encroaching civilization.

3. A New Green History of the World by Clive Ponting. Haven't gotten too far in this one yet. Judging by the summary on the back cover, it looks to be a summary of human impact on the planet since the beginnings of our species through to the present day. So far I'm not finding it terribly interesting since the first few chapters are just running through the Neolithic Revolution (change from a hunting/gathering nomadic lifestyle to an agricultural society characterized by sedentarism and a corresponding increase in social complexity), which, as an anthropology major, I've rehashed in no less than four or five different courses already. Still, I think my interest will pick up a bit more once we move on into stuff I don't already know.

PhotoChick

User avatar
Vagabonder
 
Posts: 1622
Joined: December 23rd, 2002
Location: London

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: March 25th, 2009
Atlas Shrugged - was the only single book that was meaty enough to last 17 days.

I'm up to the 70 page monologue though and it's a bit challenging to get through in one sitting.

Next on deck, something a bit lighter- The Namesake.
Latest Adventure: Una Moto en Argentina
Check out my RTW blog

Arre

User avatar
Holds PhD in Packing
 
Posts: 248
Joined: January 26th, 2005

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: March 30th, 2009
I finished The World Without Us (absolutely awesome, very much recommended) and Wilderness and the American Mind, but I'm still sitting on A New Green History of the World. I just started Walden- figure it's about time I read that- and I'm also working my way through the library's copy of Beginning Russian Vol. 1.

Funky Tee

Guidebook Dependent
 
Posts: 20
Joined: January 6th, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: April 21st, 2009
I'm currently reading Rising '44 by Norman Davies. Its a good prep for my trip to Poland in about 5 months. I can't wait to go to the Warsaw Uprising Museum.
"I wanna hang a map of the world in my house. Then I'm gonna put pins into all the locations that I've traveled to. But first, I'm gonna have to travel to the top two corners of the map so it won't fall down."

Arre

User avatar
Holds PhD in Packing
 
Posts: 248
Joined: January 26th, 2005

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: May 11th, 2009
I'm about halfway through Archaeological Fantasies, edited by Garrett Fagan. It's about the prevalence of pseudoarchaeology in recent times... overviews of the major theories and what's wrong with them, as well as speculation about why people are drawn to completely unscholarly explanations of past phenomena. I'm liking it.

HampdenHoop

Holds PhD in Packing
 
Posts: 266
Joined: March 21st, 2007

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: August 4th, 2009
Reading "The Foreign Correspondent" by Alan Furst, a novel about Italian antifascist exiles in pre-war Paris. I just got "First Stop in the New World: Mexico City" by David Lida. Skimmed through it and am looking forward to that next.

almqvist

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 4
Joined: August 21st, 2009

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: August 23rd, 2009
Iris wrote:is the book I just finished. Its the story of a man who set out on a motorcycle journey through south America in the mid 90's retracing the journey that Che Guevera and a friend took back in the 50's, the journey where Ernesto Guevera first became Che, who would become the revolutionary...great story, combination journalism, travel writing and history book.


this is my personal favourite..also a movie, and there is a movie out "Che' I think, with Benicio del Toro..an account on Guevard during his revolutionary years
Motorcycle diaries has made me want to buy a motorcycle over there and do the same, it has even translated to a Public Rickshaw around India, someday...

HooleyHoop

User avatar
Holds PhD in Packing
 
Posts: 257
Joined: November 23rd, 2006
Location: Manchester, UK

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: February 22nd, 2010
Reading two at the moment

1. Che Guevara's daries from Cuba
2. Jupiter's Travels by Ted Simon (well re-reading it....:-))

Next up:

Long Walk to Freedom by Mandela

Timmie

User avatar
Lost in Place
 
Posts: 81
Joined: July 12th, 2007
Location: Northern California

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: February 22nd, 2010
I'm just finishing-up, The Decline of the West by Oswald Spengler and Introduction to Skepticism by Richard Popkin. Also, Erewhan, by Samuel Butler.
"Whatever you can or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it". Goethe

Neverpressed

User avatar
Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 13
Joined: December 3rd, 2004

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: February 23rd, 2010
Just finished Mark Jenkins' Off the Map. An account of his bicycle trip across Siberia. More about people and places than spokes and tired legs. Now reading Ghost Rider by Neal Peart. A motorcycle trip he went on after a personal tragic loss. Both are recommended.

busman7

User avatar
World Citizen
 
Posts: 1174
Joined: January 12th, 2008
Location: Traveling for a while away from Playa San Diego SV

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: February 27th, 2010
The monk who sold his Ferrari by Robin S. Sharma

About a high profile lawyer who suffered a heart attack in the courtroom---went to India & found new meaning to life---goes on to explain how

Interesting 8-)
http://blogs.bootsnall.com/busman7 | http://wwwlasbrisasplayasandiego.blogspot.com
"I started out alone to seek adventures. You don't really have to seek them - that is nothing but a phrase - they come to you." Mark Twain

KathrynD

User avatar
Squat Toilet Professional
 
Posts: 859
Joined: November 8th, 2007
Location: California

Share on Orkut

  • Added on: February 27th, 2010
I just read 'River Town' (by Peter Hessler) about a peace corps volunteer's two years in a Sichuan town. I really enjoyed it. It's easy to read and does a great job of describing those inevitable culture clashes one runs into. The author was teaching English literature and includes excerpts from some of the essays his students write. I'm sure China has changed even more from the 90's when he wrote this, but it really captures the mood of that time.

A friend lent it to me because I'm travelling to Sichuan in April. I wish I could get to that town he discusses to see how much it's changed, but my trip is pre-set because I'm accompanying a group of high school students. Oh well, maybe next time.


PreviousNext

Return to Travel-Related Books, Music & Movies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

PLEASE NOTE: Your original BootsnAll Boards Member login still works by logging in below on the Boards.
We have a new BootsnAll Account that you will start seeing around the BootsnAll Travel Network. This new login is not yet linked to your current Boards Account. In the meantime, you will need to sign up (for a BootsnAll Account) to use Account features like Indie ™ , Traveler Profiles etc.

Quick Links

Community Activity

Statistics for the last 7 days

New posts:
0
Newest Member:
Freshroads


Indie - Multi Country Flight Finder
Round the World Travelers


Join BootsnAll on Facebook

1 (503) 528-1005

© 2018 BootsnAll Travel Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved.