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What's your best photo tip?

Conti

Lost in Place
 
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Joined: March 26th, 2007

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  • Added on: March 29th, 2007
My tip is to be creative. Don't just take the standard shot. Mix it up and find and interesting focal point.

redleader

Holds PhD in Packing
 
Posts: 154
Joined: August 16th, 2006
Location: San Leandro, CA, USA

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  • Added on: September 4th, 2007
Here are some tips from me (somewhat a novice):

1. If you're trying to go for that magical shot of a local(s), its better to ask their permission first so a.) you'll be able to compose the shot properly b.) you won't upset or offend them. Besides, you're trying to sneek a photo paparazzi style, unless you have an amazingly fast camera, good hands, and a good eye, its going to look terrible.

2. If it looks good to you or speaks to you in a special way, take the shot. I think its funny how sometimes you could take a picture of something really abstract, or break ever rule in the book, and show that picture as a snapshot to people and they'll think its a junk photo or comment on what a lousy photo it is. However, you take that same photo, print it on nice paper, put a border and frame on it and put it behind glass, suddenly its a work of art. People might not understand why you took a picture of a certain street sign, an old bicycle on the side of the road, or a random doorway. Ultimately, our travel photos are our way of sharing our experiences with everyone else and allowing them to see that destination through our eyes. Naturally there will be an interesting story to go with each and every one of your photos.

3. You can do wonders with a point-and-shoot camera. You don't have to spend $$$ on an SLR and accompanying array of lenses to bring home interesting images. Since your point-and-shoot camera won't be able to do fancy things like an SLR, focus on moments, faces, interactions, and other things that don't require a high dollar lens. A small, compact camera can do wonders in capturing the minutae of your travels, not to mention, it won't appear nearly as threatening to the locals.

4. If you can afford it, bring both your big fancy SLR for the professional looking shots of monuments, buildings, landscapes, and other tourist must-haves, and carry a small point-and-shoot in your pocket for the ocassional candids with the locals and small places like crowded cafes and shops.
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"What the hell is wrong with you C3-PO? We're here to see Europe not some crappy statue" (Eurotrip)

Littlemustard

Knows What a Schengen Visa Is
 
Posts: 397
Joined: September 28th, 2006

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  • Added on: January 17th, 2008
shoot how you feel.

Everyone has the same shot of the hot tourist spot - go ahead take it but don't make it the shot you show to everyone at home (ok, you can include it). Anyway just shoot how you feel, i realize that might sound harder than you think but it's not.

If you need to get in the mood, start shooting everything by holding the camera at hip level instead of to your eye, start shooting while intentionally blurring your shot, shoot while spinning, shoot while riding in the car, the boat, the bus, whatever.

Photography is really the only art (besides video) that can take you back to how you felt in a specific time & place. Once you have captured that, you will have an amazing album and your pics will be unique. Do that by shooting in ways that no one else does until you discover your "eye".

On a technical level, if you are having a tough time metering, meter off green grass. Just point the camera down and set the meter at that, go ahead and shoot whatever after that you should be good to go, the grass is close to middle grey which should make all your exposures work.

Fashion Photographer

Thorn Tree Refugee
 
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Joined: September 30th, 2008

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  • Added on: September 30th, 2008
My best photo tip is to get an olypus XA film camera from ebay. they are 35 years old and will set you back about $50. They are indestructable and with a good film take amazing pictures, much better than any point and shoot digital camera, I even had mine have a bucket of water tipped over it in bangkok for tai new year and even though the film was wet it was still fine.
I have a whole bunch of travel pics on my website taken with it
inspirational travel photos

redleader

Holds PhD in Packing
 
Posts: 154
Joined: August 16th, 2006
Location: San Leandro, CA, USA

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  • Added on: April 27th, 2009
Well, I'm nowhere near being a pro photographer and have never taken any form of formal photography training. I just carry a wonderful little canon point and shoot and stap photos happily along as I go. Unlike the hardcore photographers and set up for the perfect postcard shot of all the key scenes on a trip, I tend to keep my camera out all the time (since it fits in the palm of my hand) and shoot random, journal-esque photos of my day and the things I'm seeing. It helps remind me later of where I went on a given day, what I saw, what i experienced. And so what I have at the end of my trip are a series of shots, somewhat evenly spready out over the days and within the day, so that I can put my trip together using the documentary of my photos. Plus, it's effortless, I just hold out my camera, click, and keep walking.

On the occassion that I do have to shoot or more composed shot or one with people or myself in it, I tried to make the shot interesting using what I have, which is a point and shoot. I love semi-candid photos, of say, someone looking up from a book or a cup of coffee, or catching a friend/travel buddy pouring over a map on a busy street in the middle of a crazy city, things like that. What I try to avoid are the run-of-the-mill composed shots of say, a group of 6 friends, all holding up beers and looking straight at the camera in a drunken stupor, in a pub somewhere. Not that there's anything wrong with friendship, I just want to keep things a little more interesting.
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"What the hell is wrong with you C3-PO? We're here to see Europe not some crappy statue" (Eurotrip)

minerguy

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Street Food Connoisseur
 
Posts: 557
Joined: July 16th, 2005
Location: hopefully somewhere warm

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  • Added on: November 26th, 2009
Came across this article today that I liked.
The A-B-C-D-E of Travel Photography
Traveling by motorcycle to Alaska and beyond at BikeandBoots.com
Come along for the ride!

JordanRHughes

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Thorn Tree Refugee
 
Posts: 9
Joined: April 29th, 2010

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  • Added on: May 6th, 2010
Awesome tips and resources. Thank you all for your shares.

Jordan.


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honolulu hotels|orlando hotels.

As We Travel

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Armchair Traveler
 
Posts: 34
Joined: March 23rd, 2010

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  • Added on: August 29th, 2010
My best tip is to take A LOT of photos, and from different angles. Often the best photo isn't when the subject is in the middle of the photo, but perhaps in the left corner. By trying different angles you can also include other things in the background to enhance the photo.

One of my favorite "food" photos I've taken was of a huge club sandwich in the swiss alps. It was a closeup photo of the sandwich, but what made the picture look so cool was the snowy alps in the background (which wasn't even in focus).

See the possibilities!

laurentango

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Thorn Tree Refugee
 
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Joined: August 17th, 2010

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  • Added on: October 7th, 2010
I found a good book on Amazon written by a travel photographer who covers it all. Sell Your Digital Travel Photos. I am not selling but the advice has helped me improve my photos and helped me travel lightly, most important to me. I may take the books advice and try to sell through a stock agency or magzines but right now I do library shows and enjoy it.
The advice on point of view, shoot high, low, close, and distant was most helpful and the advice on getting sharp photos without carrying a tripod, invaluable.
Lauren

As We Travel

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Armchair Traveler
 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2010

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  • Added on: October 19th, 2010
Take a LOT of photos, don't just take one photo of something. Try new angles, different camera settings, a different composition.
Play with the shutterspeed and ISO and you can get some great photos!

Shannon123

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Thorn Tree Refugee
 
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Joined: October 15th, 2010

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  • Added on: October 26th, 2010
For me, a brilliant piece of landscape photography can really make or break an album. Natural photography is by far my favourite form of photgraphy. It goes without saying that choosing the right location is of utmost importance! I recently went on a mountain biking trip to New Zealand and captured some breathtaking panoramic views on film. Can honestly say it's the best place I've been to so far for inspiration. Of course NZ isn't exactly close (for us Brits, anyway). For something a bit more nearby, the Scotland Highlands also provides some beautiful scenes for gorgeous shots.

KenLuck

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Thorn Tree Refugee
 
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Joined: December 10th, 2010

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  • Added on: January 5th, 2011
When I visited Finland last time I forgot my camera at home because I was in a hurry. The landscape is so picturesque there... I was impressed. So next time I'm going to do my package beforehand and to take a lot of photos.

KenLuck

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Joined: December 10th, 2010

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  • Added on: January 5th, 2011
Just wanted to add... I realised how important to take camera on you in order to catch the moment you enjoy. So you'll be able to remember for a long time with the help of camera.

Armstead

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  • Added on: February 21st, 2011
Take too many pictures.

8-)

Markus

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Squat Toilet Professional
 
Posts: 954
Joined: May 27th, 2001
Location: Vancouver, Canada

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  • Added on: February 21st, 2011
Use your camera to tell a story. Don't just snap a few shots of the local sights and you and your companions standing in front of them, but capture the moments that fall between. Travel is about the downtime, the meals, the random moments of exhaustion. Try to take enough photos to convey the true experience you've been through, and then throw them in a slideshow when you get home. You'll probably realize that your favourite shots are the ones that don't necessarily have a definitive sense of time or place, but rather emotion or sentimentality. If you're traveling with companions, take as many candid photos of them as possible. No one wants to see your posed photos, especially if you're flashing some sort of hand sign.

Also, if you're really feeling like your composition sucks when it does come time to shoot the big famous landmarks, find the nearest postcard rack and try to recreate the photos you see there. Find the same angle, go back at the right time of day, do what you think other photographers have done before you.


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